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When it comes to household decorating, a new crop of do-it-yourselfers has emerged, eager to spackle, paint, measure, hammer, and hang. To keep pace, manufacturers of household products work diligently to provide the weekend warrior a bevy of projects. For wine enthusiasts who like to display their wine as well as drink it, a wine rack kit offers the perfect opportunity to build your own dynamic showcase.

A wine rack kit contains the essential parts for building your own wine rack. Just like a wine rack that you would purchase completely assembled, a wine rack kit comes in a variety of materials, styles, and sizes. So prior to choosing your wine rack kit you must first decide your preferences regarding its overall look.

Build Your Own Wine Rack With A Wine Rack KitFirst and foremost, you must consider your home’s décor. If you prefer contemporary décor then clearly you should choose a wine rack kit that blends with this style; the same holds true for a home decorated in any other style such as country or eclectic. The materials that make up the wine rack kit range from solid wood of all varieties, to metal and wrought iron. While a wood wine rack would complement a home with country flair, a wrought iron wine rack may look better in a more eclectic home.

When considering a wine rack kit it is important to evaluate the space with which you have to work. For someone living in a smaller environment, a hanging wine rack may be best suited for this space; this particular model hangs from the ceiling in any area of your home, keeping wine bottles out of the way while making a beautiful showcase for your collection. If you have a larger living space, then you may want to consider a standing wine rack that fits into a corner or against a wall. Either design is available for assembly with a wine rack kit.

Also consider your wine collection when purchasing a wine rack kit. If you prefer to only display a few nice bottles of wine, then a smaller wine rack kit that offers a smaller space for bottles will make the most sense. For a larger collection, or for the ability to also store or display stemware and barware, then a larger, more comprehensive wine rack kit may be in order.

Find your wine rack kit at any home good store – including the larger retail outlets. Or shop online to find some great deals. Either way, the wine rack kit is an inexpensive design feature and an enjoyable do-it-yourself project.

If you are just as interested in travel as you are in food, then the history of French foods is one in particular that you are going to want to become more familiar with. The history of French foods is one which actually begins as far back as 1400 A.D., when the first French cookbooks imitated Moorish cuisine and sugar, which was still considered very much as being a luxury, was what was used to sweeten the various dishes.

1600

During the 1600s it was Royal patronage which truly promoted French cooking, with various dishes of fish and fruit being the most popular. There are many examples, particularly from this time that go to show just how important food has always been in France. For instance a butler once killed himself because his lobsters arrived late.

It was also during this time in French history that Dom Perignon invented the art of making champagne, as he began storing his wine in bottles that were strong enough to contain the petulance of secondary fermentation. Coffee was also introduced around the same time, in 1644, while in 1686 the development of the croissant celebrated a true Christian victory in Austria over the crescent banners of the Turks.

 

1700

The 18th century also played a great role in the history of French foods, and it was really during this time in particular that the appeal of French food began to grow with the prestige of French culture. The restaurant movement also began around this time and there was a new journalistic breed coming about, namely including food critics and restaurant reviewers.

A Guide To The History Of French Foods

2000

Although the 19th and 20th centuries also had their influences on the history of French foods, it has been the 21st century more than either of those which have played a role. French cuisine is now renowned around the world more than ever before and held high in regard and respect. There is really no other country in the world that takes its cuisine as seriously and significantly as the French,< and French cooking is really not a monolith, but rather it ranges from the olives and seafood of Provence to the butter and roasts of Tours.

There is so much variety with French cuisine, and this is actually one of the most valuable aspects of all that people need to understand and recognize when it comes to the history of French foods.

Brewing a great cup of coffee depends on a number of things such as the quality of the coffee bean, the quality of the water being used, the type of brewing being done, and the grind of the coffee. Now quality of bean and water is something you can easily take care. Just use good quality beans and pure water. However the relationship between the grind of the coffee and the type of brewing being done is more detailed and could use a little explanation. Now we all know that we make coffee by passing hot water over crushed coffee beans. However for it to really work well we need to understand just how long the water should be passing over the beans. The purpose of this article is to help you understand how to match your coffee’s grind to the type of brewing you are doing in order to make the best coffee possible.

Brewing A Perfect Cup Of CoffeeGenerally speaking, the ‘soaking’ time relates directly to how coarse the coffee is ground. This means that smaller coffee grinds need less contact with the water, and coarser grinds need longer contact. Espresso coffee is only exposed to water for 20-40 seconds and as a result is made using extremely fine grind coffee. A French press coffee maker can take as much as 4 minutes and uses an extremely coarse grind. If coffee is left contacting water for too long for its grind size, unwanted extracts emerge and make the coffee taste bitter. Of course if the grind is too large and the water passes very quickly (like using frech press grind in an espresso maker), very little of the caffeine and flavours extracted and will have poor flavour.

Of course filters play an important role in managing the balance between over and under brewing your coffee. Not only do they keep the grind out of your cup, but they also control how fast the water passes over the grinds. Paper filters are the most common, but many people are also using metal varieties. Paper filters are quite good. However they can absorb some of the coffee flavour, and some people claim they can taste the paper in the final coffee. Metal filters are normally made from stainless steel or gold plated mesh. They have very fine weave and filter out the coffee grinds very well. They also do not alter the taste of the coffee at all. Metal filters are also more environmentally friendly than the paper alternative.

Whichever you choose, be sure to buy decent quality. Cheap filters often clog or not allow the coffee to brew properly. A decent quality metal filter will last years and save money in the end.

Brewing a cup of coffee is not that hard. Brewing a great cup takes a little more understanding, but isn’t any harder. Start with fresh beans and good clean water and then match your brewing style to the proper grind and then mess around with the exact proportions and pretty soon your be brewing killer coffee every time.

The birth place of coffee is relatively close to Kenya but getting it there was not an easy task and full of bloodshed. The Arabs who controlled coffee enslaved thousands of Kenyan’s where they worked on the coffee plantations in Kenya and Arabia. This was followed by the British settlers around 1900 who quickly assumed control over the country which led to more bloodshed.

History Of Kenya CoffeeIn the first part of the 20th century the interior was settled by British and European farmers who became rich by farming coffee on the backs of the Kenyan workers. By the 1930’s the farmers powers had become very strong. Even with over 1 million Kikuyu tribe members calling it home they had now real land claims according to the Europeans. To protect their interest the wealthy Europeans banned them from growing coffee, introduced a hut tax and gave them less and less for their labor. The Kikuyu were forced to leave their land and go to the cities in order to survive. This legal slavery of the population continued until the century until the British relinquished control in 1960. Despite all this bloodshed and slavery Kenya coffee has flourished and is among one of the finest cups in the world.

All Kenya coffee grown is Arabica coffee grown on the rich volcanic soil that is found in the highlands of the country. Today around 250,000 Kenyans are employed in the production of coffee. Most is produced by small land holders that are members of cooperatives that process their own coffee. Still, even with this Kenya coffee’s specialty status Kenya coffee farmers still remain among the poorest in the world. In 2001 a farmer producing 1,007 kg crop would only earn £20.14 for his labor, that same coffee is available at specialty stores for $10 + per pound.

Recently Kenya farmers have introduced the Ruiru 11 hybrid plant and it is causing concern amongst true Kenya coffee lovers. This is because it may lack the traditional Kenya coffee attributes that coffee aficionados love. The Kenya Coffee Board is trying to promote Ruiru 11 as an alternative to the farmers but their efforts are overshadowed by the rumors that it tastes like a low grade coffee from a different country. History will have to be the judge to see who is correct.

Kenya coffee has a bright acidity and a wonderful sweetness with a dry winy aftertaste. A really good Kenya coffee will also have a black-current flavor and aroma. Some of the worlds finest coffees come from Kenya and as a single origin coffee it wins praise at the cupping table. Kenya has this level of quality through a government-run system that offers rewards to farmers for producing better quality coffee. This policy has lead to steady improvements and consistent improvements in the cups quality. Each lot of Kenya coffee, if it is from a large farm or a small co-op has to undergo rigorous testing for quality by the Coffee Board of Kenya.